Melbourne Traffic Congestion

In May 2014, the RACV/Leader Newspaper published the results of their “Redspot” membership survey into the worst traffic congestion areas in Melbourne.  Here they are:

  1. Murrumbeena Rd/Neerim Rd, Murrumbeena
    Melbourne’s busiest and worst railway crossing,
  2. Chandler Highway, between Heidelberg Rd Alphington to Princess St Kew
    Bottleneck
  3. Point Cook Rd via Princes Fwy to Dunnings Rd, Seabrook.
    Congestion
  4. Koornang Rd/Morton Ave, Carnegie
    Busy railway crossing
  5. Burke Rd between Monash Fwy and Malvern Rd, Glen Iris
    Congestion
  6. Forsyth Rd/Old Geelong Rd, Hoppers Crossing
    Congestion at T intersection.
  7. Clayton Rd/Carinish Rd, Clayton
    Another busy railway crossing.
  8. High St/Spring St/Cheddar Rd. Reservoir
    Complex railway crossing.
  9. Lower Heidelberg Rd/Banksia St/Burgundy St/Jika St, Heidelberg
    Congestion
  10. Gap Rd/Horne St, Sunbury
    Busy roundabout

Click here for detailed survery results and comments.

They are already suffering a greater punishment than any of us could administer with judgement.

rbftag.jpgIt’s the distractions which harm or kill us.  Consider the following:

The link between all these, is the distractions which occurred.

A study published in June 2002 titled “The Stressed Hippocampus, Synaptic Plasticity and Lost Memories” concludes in part

“Stress, a naturalistic factor that contributes to memory impairments, constitutes a significant problem in today’s increasingly populous and long-living society.”

Or to put it another way:

‘The important factors that keep showing up involve a combination of stress, emotion, lack of sleep and change in routine, where the basal ganglia is trying to do what it’s supposed to do, and the conscious mind is too weakened to resist. What happens is that the memory circuits in a vulnerable hippocampus literally get overwritten, like with a computer program. Unless the memory circuit is rebooted—such as if the child cries, or, you know, if the wife mentions the child in the back—it can entirely disappear.’
– Professor David Diamond in a March 2009 Washington Post article

What lessons can be learnt?

  1. Remember that making a mistaking or error can happen to anyone, including you.
  2. Tiredness is your enemy.  If you are tired, you are more likely to make a mistake.
  3. Be aware of distractions.  Eliminate distractions as much as possible.
  4. Use memory aides, or checklists, as needed.
    (I’m a great believer in “Remove Before Flight” streamers.

References:

The blog post title was borrowed from a post at On The Floor @Dove.

Enable TLS 1.2 on Windows 7 & 8.

My beautiful picture We’re in the process of developing a new Windows 8.1 SOE for a customer.  One of the things I looked at was Internet Explorer HTTPS transmission security.  Out of that, one of the things I recommend is enabling TLS 1.2.

TLS 1.2 – Configure Internet Explorer to use TLS 1.2 by default.
Transport Layer Security is how web browsers* communicate over the Internet.  The current version, TLS 1.2 has a number of security enhancements & protection mechanisms over previous versions.  Enabling it is, not only a Microsoft recommendation, but a good thing.  Internet Explorer will fail back to older TLS versions if the web site doesn’t support TLS 1.2.

You can enable TLS 1.2 support via Group Policy or directly via Internet Explorer –> Internet Options –> Advanced –> Security.

How do I test that Internet Explorer is using TLS 1.2?
Visit:

  1. https://cc.dcsec.uni-hannover.de/
    If the webpage reports under the “Further Information” heading that “This connection uses TLSv1.2 with …”, then you have enabled TLS 1.2.
    or
  2. How’s My SSL?  If, under the Version heading, it says TLS 1.2, then you’re using TLS 1.2.

What about other web browsers?
No.  You’ll need to configure each web browser to support TLS 1.2.  Some have better TLS support than others.

How do I tell whether a website supports TLS 1.2?
Use SSL Configuration Checker to test the website.

What if my web host tells me to disable TLS 1.1 or TLS 1.2?
”Run!”, would be my first thought.  Your web host is telling you that they are not interested in providing a secure website.

References:
Security Advisory 2868725: Recommendation to disable RC4
Microsoft MSDN Blog – Support for SSL/TLS protocols on Windows
Disabling TLS/SSL RC4 in Firefox and Chrome
RC4 in TLS is Broken: Now What?
IE11 Automatically Makes Over 40% of the Web More Secure While Making Sure Sites Continue to Work
SSL Pulse – Survey of the SSL Implementation of the Most Popular Web Sites

* amongst other things.

The Microsoft “Ask the Performance Team” write about WMI

And I am going to include the links here, because a) they are useful and b) they compliment some of the posts I’ve written about WMI (Group Policy and WMI Filtering Slowness / The WMI Fix – which is better? / The WMI overflow error with getobject )

Ask the Performance Team:

Mid-week link roundup

Or “let’s dump all my open browser tabs out to a list”. 
ie.  this is what I’ve been working on today.

RC4 – related

TLS related

Account lockout related

Wireless Network Priority Setting in Windows 7 & 8

The Microsoft DLL Help Database – retired

SilverSeekKB back in February 2010.  Used to use the DLL Help Database quite a bit back in the heady of Windows 9x and NT4 SOE Development/Support.

I was reminded of it today when I read about SilverSeekKB.

DLL Help Database allowed you to look up a Microsoft DLL file to see what product that particular DLL version shipped with.

SilverSeekKB is kinda like that, but isn’t.

SilverSeekKB allows you to determine the latest available version of any Microsoft binary, which is handy to know.  It’s handy to know in case you’re searching for a new binary because the current binary is:

  1. causing a Blue Screen of Death, or
  2. you’ve been asked to apply a patch, and are wondering if that is the latest patch available.

There is also the “System Inspector” option, which allows you to scan a local system to see what later patches are available for installation.

Thank you for writing it Julien Clauzel.

KB2918614 – Not only does it break MSI Repair .

“What the security bulletin doesn’t say is that the change in Windows Installer repair operations means that application repair attempts will be met with a User Account Control credential window each time. However, the credentials required are administrator access.”
Bug or Feature? KB2918614 Alters Windows Installer Behavior

KB2918614 Should your application install use Active Setup, to say, personal per-user settings, then this MS14-049 security patch causes a UAC prompt as well.

The current workaround, courtesy of happysccm,  is as follows:

  1. Uninstall the application and reinstall it with the security update installed. (sourcehash file generated with security update)
  2. Manually copy the sourcehash file to c:\windows\installer folder. As the sourcehash file is generated based on the application files, the sourcehash file generated on computer A can be used on computer B.

Not scalable if, say, you have 500 packaged applications deployed to customers.

Saturday link roundup – the domain trust for a workstation

Had a question today on how to fix the “The trust relationship between this workstation and the primary domain failed” error on Windows 7.

It would appear in our case, that the Windows 7 Startup Repair is causing the trust relationship to break.  Some possible answers.