South Face Road - Rawson end

Another “C” Road Trip – Korumburra to Walhalla.

This was a trip suggested by my good friend Rebecca.  165 km / 3h 40min according to Google Maps.

The C425 from Korumburra to Warragul.
This was actually the best part of the ride.  Nice roads with some moderate bends, not that many other motorcyclists on the roads, a bit windy at times.

The C425 from Warragul to Noojee
Noojee Trestle BridgeMore bikes.  Boring-ish road.  Best part of the ride was visiting the Noojee Trestle Bridge.  The bridge was rebuilt in 1939 following the Black Friday Bush Fires.  Bec tells me that public toilets at Neerim South are probably the best ones on the ride.

The C426 from Noojee to the South Face Road.
South Face Road or Mt Baw BawWinding.  On a sports bike it would be a hoot.  On a oversized super moto, less so.  But I still had fun ripping though the corners.  I remember getting to Tanjil Bend and thinking “Shit!  I’m lost.”  A check of the map and away I went.  Parts of this road would be very slippery in the wet, with all the leaf matter and all.  Most dangerous part of the trip was clueless riders using the whole road to corner.
You’ll eventually get to the Mt Baw Baw turnoff.  Not being a snow bunny, I continued onto the South Face Road.

The South Face Road
South Face Road - Rawson end26kms of unsealed winding road, with a bike running road tires and road tire pressures, what could possibly go wrong?!?  As it turns out, nothing.  But I wish I noticed on the map that it was dirt before I got to it.  As far as dirt roads go, it was smooth, and I wouldn’t want to go speeding into the bends.  My average speed was amount 50 km/h.  At the end of the South Face Road, I turned left towards the Thomson Dam.

Thomson Dam via C466
Thomson DamWhy???  Well it’s Victoria’s largest water reservoir, and I’ve never seen it.  It’s about a 20km ride up there.  Saw a speed camera car parked on the side of the road, which was a surprise.

South Face Road to Walhalla (C466 to C461)
The township of Rawson is a pleasant little place to stop and have a look around.  The road from Rawson to Walhalla becomes narrow in sections, slippery, and occasionally there is roadkill.  Nothing like a dead wombat to make you change your line, mid-corner.

Walhalla
Very much the tourist town, you could spend the day walking around looking at things.  The Long Tunnel Mine is worth a look if you’ve never been in a mine before.

Google maps link to the route here

Roaming Profiles and OneDrive for Business

OneDrive For BusinessThe customer reported that their roaming profile wasn’t saving to the network.

So I had a look.

The customer had sync’d 2GB of data using OneDrive and was storing it in their roaming profile.  The reason being something like “so it’s available wherever I log on.”

Which I understand.  But storing anything in a roaming profile becomes a trade off between portability and reliably.  Plus you can throw in “increasing network logon/logoff times when you have a larger roaming profile.”

Microsoft’s advice on this can be best described as “la la la I can’t hear you …”

For the OneDrive for Business sync app to work as designed, the following requirements must be met:

  • The application must be installed on the local computer.
  • The user must be able to write to the user profile.
  • Data that’s written to the user profile must be saved to the local hard disk and be available without a network connection.

Leong Chee Loon, MSFT Support

So Microsoft isn’t saying Roaming Profiles are not supported, but “user must be able to write to the user profile.”  But if your System Admin has set limits on how large the Roaming Profile can grow, then the user won’t be able to write to the user profile.

Or to put it another way, OneDrive for Business is not designed to be used with Roaming Profiles.

References:

IE8 on Windows XP does not support SNI

, 64px-Internet_Explorer_7_Logoor “you desktop IT people have broken something”.

Just before Windows XP gets to take a well earned retirement on “the farm”, it popped it’s ugly head up this week with an end user complaining we did something to break their new website

On purpose no less.

It seems IE8/Windows XP was receiving the wrong HTTPS certificate.

Upon investigation, I realised that the issue was that IE8 on WinXP does not support SNI.

Server Name Indication allows a web browser to tell a web host what site it is connecting to.  (A web host can host multiple web sites …).  The reason why a browser needs to tell the web host it connects to, is so the web browser gets the right HTTPS certificate.

If the browser does not support SNI then the browser will get the default web host certificate.  Which may cause certificate errors to be displayed in the browser.

To prove that it was a lack of SNI support causing the issue, I used the excellent Qualys SSL Labs SSL Server Test tool.

I suggested to the customer that they use an alternate web browser, until they can replace Windows XP.

Travelling the “C” Road

HeathcoteIn Victoria, we have several classifications of roads, the “C” classification being the lowest grade of the classified roads.

C’ roads are generally two lane sealed roads with shoulders. ‘C’ roads provide important links between population centres and between these centres and the primary transport network. An example of a ‘C’ road is the Geelong-Portarlington Road (C123).

The good thing about “C” routes is that they really are the road less travelled.  Not much traffic, not many police and you get to see things you otherwise would miss.

Such as riding over a crest on the Burke & Wills Track near Mia Mia, and having a kangaroo bound down the road in front of you.  Skippy was bouncing along at 25 km/h, before he decided to bound into the bush.

The other thing, you get to drop in to shops which have the “Best Shop Award” for the last 5 years running.  The cynic would wonder how so many bakeries/restaurants in the same region, can win so many different prizes?  Made up awards???  Surely not!

My two recent “C” road trips were as follows:
Melbourne –> Echuca (M2 C743 C325 B75 C347 C362 C351)
Melbourne –> Maffra (C101 M1 C426 C486 C103 C105)

(with thanks to Smee for suggesting the Echuca Route)

4 is the number of Melbourne Bike Share Bicycles I needed to get home last night.

Melbourne Bike Share and friends Bicycle 1: Federation Square
Bicycle had a buckled rear wheel, which I didn’t notice until I was powering along in third gear.

Bicycle 2: Coventry Street
Misaligned handle bars, so I was steering on an angle.

Bicycle 3: Melbourne Sports and Aquatic Centre
Bike would “”skip”” a gear.  Not a big problem unless you’re powering along in 3rd gear and it skips on you.

Bicycle 4: Melbourne Sports and Aquatic Centre
This one got me all the way home.

Aside from last nights problems, I’ve had a fairly good run with Melbourne Bike Share bicycles.  By my estimate and experiences so far, I reckon about 1 in 5 bicycles are faulty.

Blind faith in technology

Technology is a great thing.  You’re flying along with not a care in the world.

Then your Electronic Flight Bag fails, leaving you without a clue as to where you are.

Do you, as a pilot, have a backup?

A Civil Aviation Safety Engineer estimated earlier this year that 90% of Visual Flight Rules pilots failed to have a backup.  A backup being maps/charts/lists of radio frequencies.  The requirements to carry a set of accessible set of maps etc. before the flight commences, is outlined in CASA Regulation 233(1)(h)

233  Responsibility of pilot in command before flight
(1)  The pilot in command of an aircraft must not commence a flight if he or she has not received evidence, and taken such action as is necessary to ensure, that:

(h)  the latest editions of the aeronautical maps, charts and other aeronautical information and instructions, published in AIP or by a person approved in writing, that are applicable:
(i)  to the route to be flown; and
(ii)  to any alternative route that may be flown on that flight;
are carried in the aircraft and are readily accessible to the flight crew.

Yes, the Pilot In Command could argue that their EFB worked before taking off, but wouldn’t it be better to have a “Plan B”?

And know how to use it.

References:
Flight Safety Australia – Blind Faith
Electronic Flight Bag – Friend or Foe