“By enabling insecure guest logons, this setting reduces the security of Windows clients”

WD MyCloudThe initial thought was “it’s another ‘SMB1 is disabled’ causing connectivity problems” problem.

Except it wasn’t.

The issue was that our customer reported that they could no longer connect to their NAS device.

With Windows 10 v1709, Microsoft disabled Guest Access.  In their words:

Cause
This change in default behavior is by design and is recommended by Microsoft for security.
 
A malicious computer that impersonates a legitimate file server could allow users to connect as guests without their knowledge. Microsoft recommends that you do not change this default setting. If a remote device is configured to use guest credentials, an administrator should disable guest access to that remote device and configure correct authentication and authorization.
 
Windows and Windows Server have not enabled guest access or allowed remote users to connect as guest or anonymous users since Windows 2000. Only third-party remote devices might require guest access by default. Microsoft-provided operating systems do not.

Guest access in SMB2 disabled by default in Windows 10 Fall Creators Update and Windows Server 2016 version 1709

For the small number of end users who will need to connect to a third-party NAS, we’ll probably manage it via exception.

Windows 10 and Office 365 update lists

The following are sites are where Microsoft list changes to Windows 10 & Office 365

Office 365

Windows 10

Microsoft breaks own application

We had a bunch of newly built Windows 10, version 1607, PCs where App-V 4.6 failed to start.

It was our own fault, App-V 4.6 is not supported on Windows 10.

It did work, until we started using Windows 10 v1607.  An upgrade to v1607 worked fine.  It was a new build where App-V 4.6 didn’t work.

It’s not as if we could ask Microsoft.  Unsupported product is unsupported.

Much Googling occurred to dig up this article
Driver Signing changes in Windows 10, version 1607.

Starting with new installations of Windows 10, version 1607, the previously defined driver signing rules will be enforced by the Operating System, and Windows 10, version 1607 will not load any new kernel mode drivers which are not signed by the Dev Portal. OS signing enforcement is only for new OS installations; systems upgraded from an earlier OS to Windows 10, version 1607 will not be affected by this change.

Existing drivers do not need to be re-signed. To ensure backwards compatibility, drivers which are properly signed by a valid cross-signing certificate issued prior to July 29th, 2015 will continue to pass signing checks on Windows 10, version 1607.

So there is the answer.  We were using App-V 4.6 SP3 HF05.  The sftplaywin81.sys file was signed on 22 September 2016.  Which is later than July 29th, 2015.

We downgraded to HF03, as sftplaywin81.sys was signed on the 16th August, 2014. 

Which fixed the problem of App-V not working.

“Logon failure: the user has not been granted the requested logon type at this computer”

CustomCPZoomedQuick answer:
In Windows 7/8/10, we use a third-party Credential Provider, and it was blocking LOCAL (ie. not Domain) accounts from logging on.  Removing the third-party CP resolved the issue.  (we have logged a fault with the vendor).

Detailed answer follows:

Continue reading

How to grab an Windows Store APPX file so you can install it offline.

I thought I’d have to do this for the Surface Pro 4 “Pen” application, but Microsoft has bundled the Pen application into Windows 10 Anniversary Version (Build 1607).

add-appxpackage

The Windows OS Hub has written a comprehensive guide on how to do this.

Modern Windows 8 apps (APPX Metro apps) are mostly designed to be installed online from Windows Store. Despite Windows allows to install Metro apps from APPX files offline, you can’t download a Metro app distribution from Windows Store. In this article, we’ll show how to download an APPX file of any Modern App using Fiddler and install it on the systems with no access to Windows Store (offline systems or corporate computers).

So, our task is to get an archive with an APPX file of any Windows 8 Metro app to install it manually on an offline system. As it has already been told, you can’t directly download an APPX file from Windows Store. However, during the installation of any app, at a certain moment a client gets a generated link to download its APPX file. Let’s try to trace the link, by which Windows Store downloads an installation file.

Further details here: How to Download APPX Installation File for any Windows Store App

Windows 10 1607 and the removal of the “TPM backup to Active Directory” feature

MBAM Logo

To back up TPM owner information from a computer running Windows 10, version 1507, Windows 10, version 1511, Windows 8.1, or Windows 8, you might need to first set up appropriate schema extensions and access control settings on the domain so that the AD DS backup can succeed. … . This functionality is discontinued starting with Windows 10, version 1607.
– Microsoft: TPM Group Policy Settings.

Those Microsoft folk give with one hand and take with the other.  No explanation for the removal.

Microsoft offer an alternative, the Microsoft BitLocker Administration and Monitoring (MBAM) product.  MBAM allows you to centrally manage Bitlocker and Bitlocker to Go.  Which is good, but comes at a cost.  From what I can see, you need several SQL Servers (Recovery Database, Compliance and Audit Database, Reporting Server, Administration and Monitoring Server)

Ok, so how does the removal of TPM Backup effect workstations which currently store their Bitlocker Recovery Key into Active Directory?  It doesn’t as far as I can see.  My Windows 10 1607 workstation is still happily storing it’s Recovery Key into AD.

But knowing Microsoft, eventually the Bitlocker Recovery Key storage feature will break and they won’t fix it.

References:
A script to push the Bitlocker Recovery Key to AD
Microsoft BitLocker Administration and Monitoring 2.5

Microsoft Cortana in the enterprise

A work in progress …

Well our first issue is “Cortana is disabled by company policy”.

speech1We MAY need to update our group policy files to the latest Windows 10 Threshold 2 version.  All 195 ADMX files.

We needed to download the English (Australia) speech pack.  We can do that for one computer, but it doesn’t scale out to 500+ Windows 10 computers.

Apparently you need to download the ‘Windows 10 Features on Demand’ iso.  Then grab the CAB files from the ISO and apply the files to our system image.

References:
Windows 10 Speech language missing
Hey Cortana! How do I add additional speeches during OSD so you work?

Windows 10 – “The properties for this item are not available”

The properties for this item are not availableThere’s a bug with Windows 10 which prevents you from seeing the properties for a folder.  To trigger it, you need to do the following:

  1. logon to Windows 10 with user account UserA.
  2. Run As an application, such as Explorer++ or QDir, with a different user account UserB
  3. right mouse-click on a folder, and select Properties.

“The properties for this item are not available” occurs.

The fix
Apply March 2016 Cumulative Update for Windows 10 for x64-based Systems (KB3140745), or later

The workaround
The “Interactive User” value needs to be removed form the the Runas registry key under [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\AppID\{448aee3b-dc65-4af6-bf5f-dce86d62b6c7}]

You may need to take ownership of the key in order to change it.

AppLocker, ActiveSetup, Group Policy; all the dumb things

4846.applocker.png-200x0Welcome, strangers, to the show
I’m the one who should be lying low
Saw the knives out, turned my back
Heard the train coming, stayed out on the track
In the middle, in the middle, in the middle of a dream
I lost my shirt, I pawned my rings
I’ve done all the dumb things

– Paul Kelly, Dumb Things

Microsoft AppLocker is a wonderful technology which allows your IT Department to prevent malicious programs from being run on your work computer.  Great in theory, and my experience is that it works with some wrinkles.  It broadly works by using Group Policy to configure what is a “Trusted” location.

Applocker and Active Setup
Active Setup allows you to execute commands once per user, early, during login.   For example, you might want to do this to configure iTunes for each user who logs onto the computer.

Each Active Setup command has a file path to the commands that you need to run.  If you don’t trust this file path in Applocker, your Active Setup fails.

If you are using System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM), then it’s likely that you’ll see this failure.

Suggestion:
If you are going to add a “Path” rule to fix this issue, you need to add two.  One for EXEs and another one for MSIs.

Removing AppLocker via Group Policy
So for whatever reason, you have a class of “”special”” computers which AppLocker is not to apply to.  So you remove the AppLocker Group Policy from the “”special”” computer.  And it still seems to have AppLocker blocking programs.

What gives?
Well what seems to be happening is this:

  1. The AppLocker Application Identity service (AppIDSvc) is set to Manual.
  2. The AppLocker registry settings are being left behind.
  3. AppLocker causes applications to be blocked.

The fix?

  1. Start the Application Identity service (AppIDSvc)
  2. Logon to the computer.
  3. Restart the computer.

This causes AppLocker to finish removing the registry settings.